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Melanin

Melanin

Say Goodbye to Melanin Disorders with Our Expert Treatments

Laser-Melanin Interactions

Laser absorption by melanin is an important component of medical and cosmetic treatments that use lasers. Alex 755 nm, Diod laser 810, and ND:Yag 1064 are three wavelengths often used to reduce the appearance of dark spots on skin resulting from hyperpigmentation. Alex 755 nm has been used for years to target brown patches, birthmarks, and tattoos. Diod laser 810 is better suited for targeting hair follicles, and ND:Yag 1064 can reach deeper layers of skin without disrupting surrounding healthy tissue. This is the most frequent laser for Laser hair removal and skin rejuvenation. Check out our publication entitled “Skin, Light and their Interactions, an In-Depth Review for Modern Light-Based Skin Therapies.” by Kamal Alhallak, Dima Omran, Salem Tomi1 and Adel Abdulhafid

Laser-Melanin Interactions

Laser absorption by melanin is an important component of medical and cosmetic treatments that use lasers. Alex 755 nm, Diod laser 810, and ND:Yag 1064 are three wavelengths often used to reduce the appearance of dark spots on skin resulting from hyperpigmentation. Alex 755 nm has been used for years to target brown patches, birthmarks, and tattoos. Diod laser 810 is better suited for targeting hair follicles, and ND:Yag 1064 can reach deeper layers of skin without disrupting surrounding healthy tissue. This is the most frequent laser for Laser hair removal and skin rejuvenation. Check out our publication entitled “Skin, Light and their Interactions, an In-Depth Review for Modern Light-Based Skin Therapies.” by Kamal Alhallak, Dima Omran, Salem Tomi1 and Adel Abdulhafid

Pigmentary disorder

Hyperpigmentation

Two common pigmentary disorders are melasma and sunspots. Melasma appears as patches of dark, irregularly shaped marks on areas of the face that have been exposed to sunlight. Sunspot lesions appear lighter freckles or moles and can manifest on parts not often exposed to the sun, such as palms, soles, and scalp. As a result, individuals with pigmentary disorders can undergo complex emotional turmoil when dealing with their appearance. If you’re experiencing any signs and symptoms related to melanin irregularities, visiting a dermatologist can help diagnose your condition so you can get on track to better managing your skin health.

Hypopigmentation

Hypopigmentation occurs when melanin, which is responsible for skin pigment and provides protection from the sun’s UV rays, is lacking in the skin. The melanin can be absent as either an anomaly in epidermal melanocytes – melanin-producing cells — or a lack of melanin-producing activity in dermal melanocytes. While hypopigmentation often occurs naturally, some are caused by injury, illness or poor nutrition. Hypopigmentation conditions include vitiligo, albinism and certain skin diseases, including leprosy, tinea versicolor and pityriasis alba. Treatment for hypopigmentation depends on etiology and severity levels but may include medical intervention, topical creams to boost melanin production or laser treatments to lessen the effects.

Hyperpigmentation

Two common pigmentary disorders are melasma and sunspots. Melasma appears as patches of dark, irregularly shaped marks on areas of the face that have been exposed to sunlight. Sunspot lesions appear lighter freckles or moles and can manifest on parts not often exposed to the sun, such as palms, soles, and scalp. As a result, individuals with pigmentary disorders can undergo complex emotional turmoil when dealing with their appearance. If you’re experiencing any signs and symptoms related to melanin irregularities, visiting a dermatologist can help diagnose your condition so you can get on track to better managing your skin health.

Hypopigmentation

Hypopigmentation occurs when melanin, which is responsible for skin pigment and provides protection from the sun’s UV rays, is lacking in the skin. The melanin can be absent as either an anomaly in epidermal melanocytes – melanin-producing cells — or a lack of melanin-producing activity in dermal melanocytes. While hypopigmentation often occurs naturally, some are caused by injury, illness or poor nutrition. Hypopigmentation conditions include vitiligo, albinism and certain skin diseases, including leprosy, tinea versicolor and pityriasis alba. Treatment for hypopigmentation depends on etiology and severity levels but may include medical intervention, topical creams to boost melanin production or laser treatments to lessen the effects.